Milkweed or Silkweed?

  Chantal Chrétien and René Boily open up an old bag of milkweed pods that were collected during the harvest last September.

Chantal Chrétien opens up a milkweed pod to demonstrate the silky floss that is being used in the development of many natural fibers for a variety of products.

 A Monarch butterfly cocoon hangs off a milkweed leaf inside the home of milkweed farmers Chantal Chrétien and René Boily.

 Bags filled with milkweed pods line the inside of the barn at La Ferme des Murmures at the end of the 2016 harvest.

A wild milkweed patch in full bloom at La Ferme des Murmures in summer 2016.

SOPHIE KUIJPER DICKSON
QUYON March 8, 2017
Chantal Chrétien and René Boily never set out to be milkweed farmers. In their various experiences working as wildlife technicians out in the field collecting data for a variety of plants and animals, not once did they imagine that in the not-too-distant future they might find themselves on a hilltop in the Pontiac growing the very plant that most farmers work to eradicate from their land.

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