The Way We Were

Compiled by Bonnie Chevrier

Feb. 9, 1994

25 Years Ago

Fishing derby lures families onto Black Bay: The tenth annual Romeo Belisle Ice Fishing Derby took place in Black Bay last weekend. The event attracted 1,042 fishermen from Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec who, all combined, reeled in a total of 294 pike, perch and pickerel.
The ice covering the Black Bay was transformed into a miniature city over the weekend with cars, trucks, tents and motorhomes as far as the eye could see.
Louise Belisle, one of the tournament’s organizers, was very pleased with he outcome of the derby.
Telebec offering Ottawa connection: Telebec subscribers in Shawville will soon have the chance to vote on free calling to Ottawa/Hull.
Pierre Picard, director of external communications for Telebec said surveys will be mailed out to all residential and business customers Feb. 11.
If the extended service to Ottawa/Hull goes ahead, customers would be able to reach 538,880 numbers toll free.

Feb. 12, 1969

50 Years Ago

New curling clubhouse now in use: The beautiful new three sheet Shawville Curling Club opened its doors to a large throng of players and watchers Monday night as curling finally became a reality for the 1969 season.
Six preliminary matches were played in the first bonspiel of the season which is a mixed event including 116 players. Seeing action on this initial night on the new ice were teams skipped by Leslie Dale, Ron McCredie, Frank Cowley, Bob McCredie, Frank Finnigan, Keith Hodgins, Bill Hanna, Martin Black, Art Kilgour, Lloyd Stevens, Percy Belsher and Bill Orr.
Shawville Minors stand second in UOVMH League: Shawville All-Star Bantams finished in second place in the UOVMH League point standings. With 12 games played, they have 17 points with 8 wins, 1 tie and 3 losses. They have been competing regularly since mid-November with the All-Star teams of Renfrew, Arnprior, C.F.B. Petawawa, Muskrat Manor, Eganville and Fort Coulonge. Renfrew lead in points. Play-offs will take place after ODHA play-offs are over.
This is the first year for this league to operate and the Shawville Bantams are to be congratulated for their fine showing.

Feb. 10, 1944

75 Years Ago

Local news: The Ration Administration of the Wartime Prices and Trade Board announces that the ten spare “F” coupons in ration book No. 3 may be used to obtain sugar for canning commencing June 1 next.
A very fine program of talking movies will be presented in the Theatre hall under the auspices of the National Film Board. These reels will be pictures of some of the great happenings in the war arena and also will deal with community and rural life in war years.
Fort Coulonge lengthened their lead in the Pontiac League on Monday night by defeating the Shawville Wildcats 11 to 3. The Wildcats went to the lumber town without Knox, who fractured his collar bone and Gibson, H. Dale and Diotte were unable to make the trip.
The Farm Forums of the Shawville district held a rally meeting in the Agricultural Hall with members from the forums at Bristol, Knox, Seventh Line, Fifth Line, Yarm and Radford present. Mr. S.W. MacKechnie, president of Pontiac County Farm Forums was in the chair and Mrs. Hillis Graham, County Secretary, took the minutes.
Germany builds high wall of hate which will remain when war ends: in its hectic endeavour to hold off invasion, Germany has constructed strong fortifications around the periphery of Europe and on the frontiers of the fatherland, says The Cleveland Plain Dealer. The whole aim of German life today is to live within Fortress Europe and postpone the inevitable. It seeks to keep the armies of the free world outside the borders of the Reich as long as possible.
There is no doubt that this wall will be breached. Before long the armies that will liberate Europe will invade the soil of Germany.


Feb. 6, 1919

100 Years Ago

Local news: Mr. MacCallum expects to be able to conduct the usual services next Sunday at Bristol, Stark’s Corners and Shawville.
Several very sad cases due to the ravages of influenza have occurred in the North Branch neighbourhood within the past couple of weeks. Two of these relate to the death of two sisters, Mrs. Smith and Mrs. I.W. Hazard within a few days of each other. The first mentioned left a family of eight small children, it is said, and the latter six children. A period of only a few days elapsed when Hazard also followed his wife to the grave, leaving the little family utterly desolate and alone in the world, in the sense that all they held dear has been taken away from them. The children are being looked after, however, and homes will be found for them.
The secretary of the municipality of Clarendon informs THE EQUITY that he has just received from the Dept. of Roads, Quebec, a cheque for $500 on account of gravelling work performed during the past year.
The amount received is the maximum which the government pays annually in such cases.Feb. 6, 1919Local news: Mr. MacCallum expects to be able to conduct the usual services next Sunday at Bristol, Stark’s Corners and Shawville.
Several very sad cases due to the ravages of influenza have occurred in the North Branch neighbourhood within the past couple of weeks. Two of these relate to the death of two sisters, Mrs. Smith and Mrs. I.W. Hazard within a few days of each other. The first mentioned left a family of eight small children, it is said, and the latter six children. A period of only a few days elapsed when Hazard also followed his wife to the grave, leaving the little family utterly desolate and alone in the world, in the sense that all they held dear has been taken away from them. The children are being looked after, however, and homes will be found for them.
The secretary of the municipality of Clarendon informs THE EQUITY that he has just received from the Dept. of Roads, Quebec, a cheque for $500 on account of gravelling work performed during the past year.
The amount received is the maximum which the government pays annually in such cases.

Hon. Mr. Doherty, Canadian Minister of Justice, has proposed to the Peace Conference, the creation of an international house of representatives, one of the main objects of which would be the prevention of war.
Universal prohibition of the liquor traffic in the United States is to become effective on Jan. 16, 1920.
President Wilson’s plan for the internationalization of the German colonies wrested from her during the war, has been accepted by the Peace Conference although at first it was strongly objected against by the representatives of the Dominions.

Feb. 8, 1894

125 Years Ago
Local News: The snow storm of Monday night and Tuesday morning, 29th and 30th was the worst experienced in Ottawa for the past 25 years.
Mr. Dan Kennedy takes the cake for delivering the weightiest load at Gillies’ Bros. shanties thus far this season, it being 147 pounds in excess of that delivered by J. McGuire last week.
Mr. George Morris, one of the oldest and best known farmers in Sheenboro has presented St. Paul’s church in his native place with a fine new organ.
Mr. R. J. Black has just completed the woodwork of a trotting cutter for Mr. John Lester that weighs only 35 pounds.
Mr. Jos. Smith returned on Friday night from driving Mr. Geo. Campbell and two men to the Perley limits on Coulonge. Joe says they measured 5 feet 7 inches of snow on top of a stump.
Mr. Campbell, accompanied by George Hackett, the Indian, intends starting at once to explore the country from he Perley limits through to the Quinze.
A gang of men from the shanties on the Black River went down by train on Tuesday morning. They were log cutters from Eddey’s shanties, they having stopped cutting for the season.
Mr. A. J. Jackson has finished painting the lodge room of the new Masonic hall.
Thos. W. Boyle says he can collar any man in Pontiac. Not in a fisticuff encounter, but with an A1 horse collar, which for safeness and durability cannot be beaten.
Ad: The undersigned begs to inform the public that to avoid the inconvenience consequent on the closing down of the Portage du Fort Grist Mill from low water, he has put in a powerful steam engine which renders him independent of the water supply and ensures against interruption. Gerald H. Brabazon, proprietor.

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