Sunday, July 14, 2024
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The search for Fort-Coulonge: Site of the original Fort-Coulonge fur trading post remains elusive

A search for the site of the fur trading post that served as the namesake for Fort-Coulonge has been underway in Davidson for the past two years on the property of Vella Boisvert Lefebvre.
A team of archaeologists led by Francis Lamothe has made its second visit to the plot since 2020, with the partial goal of determining whether or not European activity at the site’s dates back as far as 1685.
Historians know that a fur trading post that would later lend its name to the modern day town of Fort-Coulonge was built in the area in the late 1600s, yet the precise location is vague. While details like how regularly the original post was occupied are uncertain, it does seem certain that it was completely abandoned after the British conquest of New France in 1761 and then rebuilt and enlarged by the Northwest Company in the late 1700 and early 1800s, possibly in a different location.
The Hudson’s Bay Company then acquired the post after merging with the Northwest Company in 1821 and was operated until the region’s economy transitioned away from the fur trade and towards the lumber industry in the 1840s and 50s.
While historians have already confirmed that the 1800s post was located in . . .

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